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Zoom Oct. 22. More Recursion

The divide-and-conquer examples we saw in the previous session were on the easy side. In this session we look at some much more challenging examples.Included in this session is segregate, the most…

From  Hannah Lee on October 27th, 2020 0 plays

Lesson 18.3 Tables

A table of data is one that is divided up into regular rows and columns. In this video we show how to represent a table as a two-dimensional nested list. While there are alternate ways of…

From  Hannah Lee on October 27th, 2020 6 plays

Lesson 18.1 List of Objects

Lists require that we explicitly show the folder when visualize them. In this video we show what that means when a list contains other objects that have their own folders. The result is a chain of…

From  Hannah Lee on October 27th, 2020 8 plays

Lesson 17.7 The Division Step

Up until now, we have claimed that it does not matter how you divide your date in divide-and-conquer. In this video we show one of the ways in which it might matter. In particular, not thinking about…

From  Hannah Lee on October 19th, 2020 21 plays

Lesson 17.1 Recursive Definitions

Recursion is a general concept that does not just apply to programming languages. In this video we show that recursion exists in mathematics and even natural language.

From  Hannah Lee on October 19th, 2020 21 plays

Lesson 16.8 Tuple Expansion (OPTIONAL)

This video introduces an advanced topic that is completely optional and will not appear on any exam. You might have noticed that some functions, like max can take an arbitrary number of arguments. In…

From  Hannah Lee on October 19th, 2020 3 plays

Lesson 16.7 For-Loops and Testing

Another control-structure means another video on testing. But if you have following the Rule of Numbers, you will discover that you have enough tests for your for-loop. Instead, as we show in this…

From  Hannah Lee on October 19th, 2020 13 plays

Lesson 16.6 Mutable For-Loops

Lists are mutables and support mutable functions. Many of these mutable functions contain for-loops. As we show in this video, this changes how we write the for-loop. In particular, we will not use…

From  Hannah Lee on October 19th, 2020 13 plays

Lesson 16.4 Range-Based For-Loops

Strings, lists, and tuples are not the only iterable types. In this video we introduce the range function, which creates another iterable value. This is going to allow us to do several things that we…

From  Hannah Lee on October 19th, 2020 18 plays

Lesson 15.6 List Methods

Lists have many of the same methods as tuples. But since they are mutable, they have even more. In this video we show off some of the mutable methods of lists, which are methods that can alter the…

From  Hannah Lee on October 10th, 2020 12 plays

Lesson 15.1 Tuple Expressions

In this video we introduce the first new sliceable type, the tuple. We show why we need this new type, and why it is more flexible than a string.

From  Hannah Lee on October 10th, 2020 12 plays

Lesson 13.3 Assert Statements

Determining responsibility can get really tedious. In this video, we show how we can responsibility explicit by creating errors on purpose. We introduce the assert statement, which will allow us to…

From  Hannah Lee on October 10th, 2020 10 plays

Lesson 13.2 Error Responsibility

When we introduced specifications, we talked about responsibility; if there is a problem with a function, it is either the fault of the definer or the caller. In this video, we show how we read an…

From  Hannah Lee on October 10th, 2020 8 plays

Lesson 13.1 Error Messages

Most of you have seen error messages already, working on the course assignments. But what do these error messages mean? As we seen in this video, we could not really talk about them until now because…

From  Hannah Lee on October 10th, 2020 9 plays

Lesson11.3 Object Visualization

Visualization is a reoccuring theme in this course. In this video we introduce a brand new visualization framework to help us understand how objects work. This new folder metaphor will become…

From  Hannah Lee on October 2nd, 2020 7 plays

Lesson 10.6 Top-Down Design

Top-down design is a widely–used design technique. Your instructor used it to design the first assignment, and you will use it yourself in later assignments. In this video we take a closer look…

From  Hannah Lee on October 2nd, 2020 3 plays